Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (RAEME) soldiers used their skills to keep the Stadium Super Trucks racing during the NTI Townsville 500 Supercars event earlier this month.

Nine junior RAEME soldiers from units across the 3rd Brigade were selected to support the Super Trucks from July 9 to 11, working with the drivers, conducting general vehicle maintenance, body repairs and staging the ramp jumps. 

More familiar with working on armoured cavalry tanks, Corporal David Seymour from the 2nd Cavalry Regiment explained how the adaptability of their trade-based skills allowed the RAEME soldiers to integrate within the Super Trucks team. 

“Once we received a quick rundown of the vehicle design and systems, we could easily implement our knowledge received through our Army trade training,” Corporal Seymour said. 

“We worked alongside the regular maintenance crew and the guys got really involved as the weekend progressed, eventually doing some pretty large repairs.”

Getting to know the vehicles and drivers over the weekend, Corporal Seymour said he enjoyed the challenge and the rewards of seeing the vehicles performing in front of the Townsville community. 

“I think it’s a highlight for any mechanic to see something you have fixed back out on the track again, knowing you identified a fault, repaired it and returned the equipment to the owner is quite satisfying,” he said.

Craftsman Ned Staehr, of the 4th Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery, lifting one of the Super Trucks jumps. Photo: Corporal Brodie Cross

Super Truck driver Toby Price said he was excited to have the soldiers working on his vehicle.  

“These guys go into some pretty remote locations and fix things out in the middle of nowhere, so they’re a great hand for us to have over the weekend looking after the trucks. It’s great to have them here,” Mr Price said. 

Craftsman Ned Staehr, of the 4th Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery, jumped at the opportunity to test his skills at the track.

“Working with the Super Trucks team was great. It gave us a chance to work with our trade in a vastly different environment from what we usually experience,” Craftsman Staehr said. 

“The prioritisation of work and quick repair tasks was where the similarities of our jobs were most noticeable.

“I really enjoyed watching the races knowing that we helped keep the trucks on the track.”

Toby Price launches his Super Truck during the NTI Townsville 500. Photo: Corporal Brodie Cross