Air Force has lost one of its past great leaders with the death of former Chief of Air Staff Air Marshal David Evans at the Greenway Views retirement home, Canberra, in early September.

His funeral was held in Canberra on September 15.

Air Marshal Evans' career spanned World War II, the Berlin Airlift and through to the Vietnam War before he was appointed as Chief of the Air Staff in 1982, and retiring in 1985.

Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld said Air Marshal Evans' contribution to the country and the Air Force could not be overstated.

"He was among the first teenagers to join the Air Training Corps upon its foundation in 1941, and enlisted in wartime RAAF on June 5, 1943," Air Marshal Hupfeld said.

"He graduated in the Empire Air Training Scheme as a Sergeant pilot in 1944 and was in the middle of a conversion course when World War II ended."

Air Marshal Evans was slated to be demobilised along with several thousand other Australians. 

"However, so deep was his desire to serve his country as an aviator and warrior, he travelled to RAAF Headquarters in Melbourne and argued his individual case with the officer responsible for discharges," Air Marshal Hupfeld said.

"He was successful."

Air Marshal Evans continued his career in Air Force, which included flying for the Berlin Airlift, service in Vietnam in 1967 and several high-profile roles within Air Force.

He was promoted to Air Marshal in 1982 and appointed to Chief of the Air Staff where he focused on morale, air power doctrine and improving defensive capabilities in northern Australia.

Although he retired in 1985, he continued to serve his country by writing and lecturing on defence matters and passing on his vast knowledge to a new generation. 

He also served as patron of numerous organisations, including the Airfield Defence Guards Association, the Royal Australian Air Force Association (ACT Division), The Celtic Club Australia, and the Royal Australian Air Force Staff College Association

"Air Marshal Evans was a truly great thinker and contributed immensely to building the sophisticated, professional force I have the honour of commanding today," Air Marshal Hupfeld said.

"For those of you who had the pleasure of knowing Air Marshal Evans, I hope you will spare a moment to remember the person who his successor, Air Marshal Jake Newham, described as possessing an, 'extraordinary zeal and robustness that helped instil a renewed sense of pride in the service'."