Although Aircraftwoman Genna Mervis is early into her Air Force career, she is a veteran of donating blood.  

Aircraftwoman Mervis is a serial blood donor having been encouraged by her dad to join him giving a drop to help save others. It’s been 10 years since she started donating.

Last year she was one of the 2000 Air Force contributors whose donations had the potential to save 7000 Australian lives. 

Aircraftwoman Mervis was born in South Africa and moved to Perth, WA, then to Maroubra, NSW.

She undertook a Master’s Degree in International Relations at the University of NSW and then moved on to her Air Force career as an IT and communications specialist with Headquarters Air Warfare Centre.

“None of my family are in the ADF – I’m the first. I’m loving the Air Force and have learnt a lot,” Aircraftwoman Mervis said. 

She said her donations were making a difference.

“It’s just a good thing to do and people really need it. The thought of actually helping someone brings it alive to me,”  Aircraftwoman Mervis said. 

After a recent donation, Aircraftwoman Mervis said she was advised by text that her blood was being used for an anonymous recipient.

She said she was keen for colleagues to take up this year’s Defence Blood Challenge knowing that each single donation can save the lives of three fellow Australians.

“It’s an eye-watering statistic. Just do it – it doesn’t hurt to try. You’ve got nothing to lose apart from a little blood and that regenerates quickly,” Aircraftwoman Mervis said.

Mobile Lifeblood collection vans are stationed at various Air Force bases and other locations for the three-month campaign. 

The Defence Blood Challenge is looking to break records with an aim of 9500 donations this year.

For more information visit: www.donateblood.com.au/lifeblood-teams