Indigenous students received a sneak peek of life in the Army during a tour of two 7th Brigade units at Gallipoli Barracks, Brisbane.

Thirty-eight high school students visited Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers workshops and were introduced to some of Army’s newest vehicles at the 7th Combat Service Support Battalion as well as Australian Light Armoured Vehicles and M1A1 Abrams Tanks at 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment (Queensland Mounted Infantry).

The visit was part of the annual Indigenous Science and Infrastructure Development School program, which provides students from across Australia with an insight into different Defence, corporate and academic pathways.

The Regional Indigenous Liaison Officer for South Queensland, Warrant Officer Class One Geoff Frew, said Defence’s involvement in the program had yielded tangible results.

“It’s only a quick visit but it certainly does have an impact on the students and I know that the past four years we’ve been doing this there has been some positive approaches by the students to Defence Force Recruiting,” Warrant Officer Frew said.

Students Julia Love and Holly Summers may eventually contribute to those positive statistics after enjoying their time on base.

“The Defence Force is on my list of careers I’m considering, either with the dogs, bomb squad or Special Forces, so it was interesting to see the different pathways and avenues available,” Miss Summers said.

Miss Love has already experienced Air Force Cadets and said the visit helped reinforce her desire to join the Defence Force.

“I am considering a career in Defence. I have an interest in air traffic control and I’d like to pursue that, but I’m also looking at other opportunities as well,” Miss Love said.

The visit occurred in the lead up to NAIDOC Week and was an opportunity to highlight to Indigenous youth the contributions and achievements of past and present Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander servicemen and women in defence of Australia’s national interests.